Edna enters the “teen” months

It’s time for an Edna update!

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Edna effortlessly charms the Alaska Airlines staff at Ketchikan airport.

She has been busy, these two months she has been a Landis household member. After three weeks living here, it was time for family vacation. She traveled with us to Blanchard, Washington which is near my family and at the border near northern Idaho.

We had a layover at SeaTac airport long enough that my daughter, Claire and I picked her up at the Alaska Air counter and took her out for a little break near the miserable “dog area” outside the terminal. We found some shade near a strip of shrubs above the area, and even better, an adorable 8-week old boxer puppy that was on its way to Anchorage with a friend of her new mom’s.

Edna was unimpressed with the puppy. I have found, since, that she will bare her teeth at puppies after the first 30 seconds or so of greeting, and even at some adult dogs she meets. That is something I am working on.

My latest idea, to remedy this unfriendliness, is to use one of her favorite noisy toys, like a squeaky or plastic bottle, to distract her from her ugly thoughts and channel her energy positively. That has worked with my older search dog, Levi, who also has feelings about new dogs that aren’t all happiness and butterflies. 🙂

We lived for two weeks in our vacation rental and Edna really was delighted with the resident ranch dogs, German shepherd Ivan and Boston terrier mix, Cruiser. She also really liked Luke, my brother’s young Doberman pinscher, which he just adopted last spring.

Edna and Ivan in the front yard of our vacation rental.
Edna and Ivan in the front yard of our vacation rental.
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Edna and Luke chill near the pool while we play in the sunshine.

Most of our training has not been too fancy. My strongest priority has been to finish up potty training! That is my least favorite task with a new dog. Once she hit 16 weeks, it seemed like she began to be capable of more awareness and focus and began to go to the door when she needed to go out.

Nevertheless: there still are accidents when I am not vigilant enough. It’s just the way puppy raising goes. 🙂

She has gotten very good at a few obedience exercises though. She can bark on command, which is critical for our SAR training. She also has a good start on competition-obedience-style heeling, a quick, clean drop on command, walking backwards, staying in a given position for 15 seconds or so at a time, “shake” paw/hand, “come,” sit and stay for dinner and we are starting on the “stand stay.”

I am using clicker training for many tasks, but not all. The worst thing about using a clicker is that I often don’t have it with me when I need it!

We also are practicing loose-leash walking.

One of her more annoying traits is that she submissively pees when meeting new people. I have noticed that in the last week this is lessening, which is great. I’ve just ignored it, feeling pretty sure it would fade as she gained maturity and confidence. Even more annoying is that she loves to exuberantly greet our two cats while peeing and swishing her tail through the puddles. Oh, the joys of a puppy!

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Edna at the Kootenai County fair in northern Idaho.
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Edna on September 26, with her newest ear style. She has had both down, one up, both up, and now both sideways – “rose ear” style.

Since returning home, Edna has been meeting many new people, puppies, dogs and training a little bit every day. I have introduced her to many different types of toys, so I can decide which type will motivate her the most when we begin search problems.

We take at least a one-hour hike each day, and I am focused on getting to know her so I can be the best handler for her when we are ready to hit the woods for some real work!

Edna’s second week

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Edna after a fun walk of exploring a muskeg.

Edna is growing quickly, and learning fast.

An important thing to remember when raising a puppy, or training a new dog, is that they are learning every minute. It is up to you to control their experience, so pup learns what you want her to learn.

If you cannot control pup’s actions, (i.e. you are in the shower, or engrossed in a cooking project,) put pup in her crate for a rest, or to chew a stuffed Kong toy or other tough, safe treat.

Edna has been working hard on potty training. She actually has gone to the door a few times, especially for poop, as that’s easier for them to sense when they need to go. Critical points on potty training:

  • success will take hundreds of repetitions.
  • you will have success, then failures. A couple of evenings ago, Edna was in a super crazy mood and had one pee and two poop accidents only a few feet away from me! I just couldn’t keep up with her. This is where your sense of humor and patience comes in handy. Stay calm clean up and you’ll have another chance to reward pup outdoors very, very soon. 🙂
  • Make sure you have treats in your pocket all the time, to reward good behaviors such as sit, down, potty outside, come when called, off (four paws on the floor), and anything else you like.
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Edna exploring the beach while camping.

Edna is getting very good at learning to sit and wait for her food. I leash her after I have all five bowls filled. When I set all the bowls down, the leash keeps her in her spot. When the bowls are down I ask her to sit. She (and the four other dogs) are not given the “ok” command to eat until Edna is in a good sit — don’t get in a hurry on this one! This means sitting with a LOOSE leash. This is a great exercise to teach self control.

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My husband, David pilots the skiff to the beach while my 9-year-old son, Izaak holds Edna on her first of many, many boat rides.

Another critical exercise to work on with a puppy or any new dog is food safety. Do not take the bowl away while they are eating at this stage, it only makes them defensive and less safe with their food. I save leftover meat bits and while Edna is eating, I stroke her body, touch her paws and put the meat bits in her bowl. That way, the dog learns that a hand coming toward them always is positive and they never should worry, growl or bite. I also ask kids to do this, as dogs often do not think of kids as worth respecting.

We continue to work on “come” although she runs to me immediately and at top speed right now. All pups, as they grow older, will become more distracted by the outside world (like any teenager!) and can lose that 100% great come when called if you are not careful to continue strengthening it with high-value treats, and practicing in all types of places, with all types of distractions, and following through to make pup come when it decides to disobey and wander off. If the wandering off or running away happens, put a long, light leash on pup and try again, using the leash to guide the behavior.

I had a couple of episodes this week where Edna, coming out of our fenced yard with me after a potty to our deck-side door about two feet away, would get distracted by a cat or a bird or … nothing (she’s a puppy, after all!) and wander away instead of following me straight through the door. I have been solving that by using a treat (actually, just a piece of her kibble – mostly I use her kibble for treats right now, to keep her tummy happy.) The way I give the treat in this instance is to lure her through the door while saying “let’s go” to encourage a habit of moving fast to the door, all the way indoors. Then, I drop the treat on the floor inside.

I also brought her out to our garden, dragging a light leash just in case I needed to control her, and she had fun walking around in our raspberry thicket, stealing berries that had fallen and biting weeds.

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Edna helping with raspberry harvest.

I have been shaping some obedience trial behaviors, just in case I decide to compete with her later. A straight front sit, a fold-back drop down, a “get back” to heel position, eye contact and even a heel with head up (only one step at a time for now) are mostly what we play with for now.

The only Search and Rescue type things she’s done is explore creeks, ponds, muskegs (where she fell in many watery mud holes!) – obedience and socializing so she’s comfortable with all people, noises, floor surfaces etc. I also introduced her to carefully chosen new dogs.

She also had her first skiff rides this week, when we took her for a two-day camping trip to a nearby remote beach. She slept in her crate in the tent very quietly, and explored with great happiness. She loved the seaweed.